CPE, CPC, and More in 2015

A few updates. As Summer is beginning here (Summer starts in March in the Philippines) a number of things are happening.

1.  Clinical Pastoral Care.  CPO (“Clinical Pastoral Orientation”), a shortened-form of CPE intended for professionals and Bible school students, is finishing up in Baguio. CPO has requirements that are approximately 1/4th of a Full Unit of CPE (and according to my calculations, that is 1/2 of the requirements of a Half Unit). It provides a taste of the philosophy and training structure of CPE for those who are curious… and can be taken for school credit in some places.

Additionally, our Foundations of Clinical Pastoral Care book in development has just pased the 100 page mark (finally). It is almost a year and a half in development… but it is rolling now. It seeks to integrate the methodology and insights of the modern CPE and pastoral care movements, with the insights and theological grounding of the historical pastoral care movement. Prayerfully, the first draft should ready by June. This will provide the text basis for CPO/CPC training.

CPO will start again, hopefully, in June or July, but this time in Bulacan. Will keep you updated. <Note: While CPE is certified certified by CPSP-PI in conjunction with the standards of CPSP, CPO is not. It is a training program under the standards of Bukal Life Care… following methodology and quality standards of the CPSP-PI CPE program.>

2.  Clinical Pastoral Education. CPE always seems to be a fluid thing since it is small groups driven by need and opportunity. However, it LOOKS like CPE will be held this Summer at:

  • Three locations in Manila
  • One location in Baguio
  • One location in Korea

3.  D.Min. in “Pastoral Counseling and Clinical Pastoral Supervision.”  This program is held in Central Philippines University, in partnership with CPSP and CPSP-PI. The program is new but on-going. We are excited by its potential.

4.  Disaster Response Chaplaincy. CPSP-PI, Bukal Life Care, and Philippines Baptist Theological Seminary, will be holding a 3-day intensive training in Disaster Response Chaplaincy May 13-16 (yes, it looks like 4 days… but the ends are cut off). One of the goals of CPSP-Philippines is to add a sub-specialty for Clinical Chaplains of Disaster Response Chaplain.

5.  CPSP-PI Standards and MOA. CPSP-Philippinesstandards have been disseminated for utilization by chapters, training centers, and CPE programs. They closely follow the standards set by CPSP. The Memorandum of Agreement between CPSP and CPSP-Philippines has been written up and is presently being reviewed by both parties. Hopefully, the final version will be done soon for signing. The MOA will ensure equivalency of programs and reciprocity of certifications between the organizations.

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Relief for the Philippines

This is a reprint of an article on the College of Pastoral Supervision & Psychotherapy (www.pastoralreport.com) website.

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Relief For The Philippines By Barbara A. McGuire

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UPDATE: Hundreds of survivors were moved to Manila, where the local churches are now overwhelmed. They quietly lament “we have lost everything”. There was a report of a woman whose family members survived Haiyan, the worst typhoon on record; but then later died from starvation. The little island they lived on was completely devastated and no help arrived in time to bring them food or water.

Our CPSP colleagues have been training chaplains in Baguio to be ready to go to Manila to provide support. The needs are endless.

Many generous donations have been coming in and we thank those who have already donated but we need additional support. Please consider sending a donation today. Any amount you can afford will make a BIG difference.

The New Amsterdam Chapter, New York with the Philippines team is committed to bringing help and healing to our typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) survivors.
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Relief For The Philippines
The stories coming out of the Philippines are unimaginable. Rushing water and wind tearing children away from their parents’ arms.
Haiyan was one of the most intense typhoons on record. This storm left catastrophic and unimaginable destruction behind.
Emergency Support

The New Amsterdam Chapter is organizing a relief effort along side our CPSP Philippines colleagues. The CPSP Philippines will distribute funds collected along with non-perishable items to the places where they are most needed.

The New Amsterdam CPSP Chapter requests your assistance by donating canned goods, clothing, toiletry items (shampoo, medical supplies, etc.), along with cleaning supplies, learning materials for children, or monetary donations.

Please bring or mail clothing, and non perishable items to:

Barbara A. McGuire
3207 William Street
Wantagh, NY 11793

Question call: Barbara at:
516-316-5629

All checks need to be made out to:
CPSP (Philippines Relief Fund)

Mail checks to:

Barbara McGuire
C/O CPSP – Philippines Relief Fund
3207 William Street
Wantagh, NY 11793

All donations are greatly appreciated and will go directly to the people via our CPSP Philippines colleagues.

Thank you!

The New Amsterdam Chapter:
Barbara A. McGuire, Cesar Espineda, John Jeffery, Geof Tio, Susan McDougall, Sergio Manna

Barbara A. McGuire
barbara.a.mcguire@gmail.com

Typhoon Response in the Philippines

CPSP-Philippines has been busy both in training workers and providing crisis care to primary victims of Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda). Two groups, one from Baguio and one from Manila, came together to work with refugees in Manila as well as those still in Tacloban.

Joyce and Noel are still in Tacloban.  They have done much work there together with the Bless Yolanda survivors group.  Today, she was asked to speak at the meeting with the UN, Commander of the whole operations at the airport, DSWD, Office of Civil Defense and other countries’ leaders manning the airport.  The person who hosted them there is Commodore Roy Trinidad, a naval officer that I worked with during the Sendong relief operation at Iligan City.

As per training and collaboration work, Toogsie conducted three crisis care trainings – Irosin, Sorsogon, GCF-East and CCF-St. Francis Square. The CCF training was attended by various stakeholders from the government and private organizations (PNP, DOH, Clinical Psychologists, Ministers, Lay Volunteers, etc.).  Tootsie and Joyce co-taught at GCF and CCF.  For the last two Saturdays, Tootsie’s group went to United Evangelical Church of the Philippines, a Chinese Church in Binondo, to debrief the survivors who were mostly Chinese businessmen and to facilitate the crisis care training conducted by Ms. Cristina Co, a professor at AGS and pastor at said church.